History & Tourism

The Great Richland Quiz Number Two: The Answers

21 Jan , 2023  

By 1812Blockhouse

Here are the answers to our quiz posted yesterday about an icon of early local history, John Chapman, also known as Johnny Appleseed. Give yourself one point for each correct answer and see how you fared. 

  1. A Perrysville woman remembered Johnny visiting her family home as a child. When sleeping, she remembered, he would lay on the floor and put his head on what? — Answer: A bag of appleseeds, of course
  1. When did he move out of the Mansfield area, saying a final good-bye to his friends here?
    1. 1821
    2. 1828
    3. 1837
    4. 1838

Answer: 1838. Some have the date as 1840, but the majority of sources specifically state 1838.

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History & Tourism

The Great Richland Quiz Number Two: Johnny Appleseed

20 Jan , 2023  

By 1812Blockhouse

This is the second in a quiz series on all things local. Our first quiz looked at Richland County geography.

That quiz can be accessed here.

Today we are looking at an icon of early local history, John Chapman, also known as Johnny Appleseed, through a set of ten questions. We will be sharing the answers tomorrow here on 1812Blockhouse.

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History & Tourism, Shelby

Landmarks Of Richland County: First Presbyterian Church, Shelby

15 Dec , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

This church building is testament to faith and resilience.

The present First Presbyterian Church of Shelby, located on North Gamble Street, has occupied this spot for the last 115 years. It stands on the lot to the south of the Post Office Building, the subject of another recent post in this series.

The fact that it exists, however, is rather miraculous.

Presbyterians first met in the Shelby area in the early 1820s. After a couple of initial locations, the congregation built a church on South Broadway in 1851. More…

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History & Tourism, Shelby

Landmarks Of Richland: Citizens Bank, Shelby

10 Dec , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

It is very possible that in 2022, the majority of our readers will not immediately recognize the building built by the former Citizens Bank in Shelby, a pacesetting financial institution in its day.

On the other hand, if the name “The Vault” is mentioned instead, many will immediately realize that they not only know where today’s Landmark of Richland is, but that they have actually been inside to consume or beverage.

When the Board of Citizens Bank decided in 1910 to construct a permanent home for their almost 20-year-old institution, they chose a high profile location for that structure – the northwest corner of Main and Washington Streets in the heart of downtown Shelby.

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History & Tourism

Thanksgiving Tidbits From 1812Blockhouse

23 Nov , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

Here at 1812Blockhouse, we enjoy stepping back in time to try to get a feel for the Richland County of long ago.

So this holiday, join us for a trip through Thanksgivings past.

By the way — we are taking tomorrow off to spend quality and quantity times with our families. We will se you bright and early on Friday.

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: The Would-Be Billionaire, Verner Zevola Reed

9 Nov , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

In our Richland Roots series, we briefly present the lives of men and women from Richland County — either by birth, or residence — that have made important contributions to American history but who may not be household names.

Other posts in our series can be viewed and read here.

Today’s subject may be one of the the wealthiest people that Richland County has ever produced. While that is a difficult concept to measure, in terms of accmuluated wealth for the time in which he or she lived, it would be difficult to beat the financial success of Verner Zevola Reed. More…

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History & Tourism

Landmarks Of Richland: Silas Ferrell House, Shiloh

6 Nov , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

It’s not unusual for the most successful merchant in one of Ohio’s numerous small cities and villages to have built the most architecturally sophisticated house in town.

Such was the case in Shiloh, where the owner of the general store, who also owned an agricultural equipment factory and grain elevator, built a wonderful house on East Main Street about 1880.

It is also not unusual for these types of properties to be used in subsequent decades as funeral homes. In the case of the Silas Ferrell House, it became the location for the McQuate Funeral Home.

The house sits at 25 East Main Street. More…

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History & Tourism

It Happened In Richland County: The Great Cattle Stampede Of 1812

3 Nov , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

In this series on 1812Blockhouse, which we call “It Happened in Richland County,” we share stories about the county’s past that might bring a tear to your eye or a smile to your face. Each happened right here.

We begin with a tale from the fall of 1812, when Richland County was brand new and a rather dangerous place. Skirmishes between British, Native American, and American troops were commonplace.

Ohio Governor Meigs issued a call for able bodied men to come to the aid of settlers in the frontier regions of the state. Enter a band of Ohio Volunteer Militia led by General Reasin Beall who gathered together at Wooster. Soon alarmed by news that two Richland County families had been killed by members of the Delaware tribe, Beall’s army soon headed west.

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All About Richland, History & Tourism

Landmarks Of Richland: The Tubbs-Sourwine House

19 Oct , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

The local Plymouth landmark known as the Tubbs-Sourwine House has long had a connection with the rail line it faces.

Constructed on a rise at 49 Railroad Street between 1867 and 1870, it was originally the home of Henry Bitley Tubbs and Eve Reed Tubbs. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: Lloyd Garrison Wheeler: Part One

14 Oct , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

Shortly before his death in 1909, a husband, a Mansfield native, and wife from Chicago boarded a train and headed south, their destination a relatively new place of higher education in rural Alabama. The couple was no stranger to southern life, having spent years living in Arkansas some three decades before. On this occasion, however, the man was leaving behind a set of business difficulties and accepting a position which had been offered to him by a long-time friend. More…

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