History & Tourism

Literary Mansfield: The Poetry of Salathiel Coffinberry

22 Feb , 2021  

By 1812Blockhouse

This was the first post in our series which looks at the ways in which Mansfielders, past and present, have been involved with books, poetry, music, and other written works. We’ve been calling this series, “Literary Mansfield.”

Our first subject back in 2017 was a resident of Mansfield for some, but not all, of his long life. The saga of Salathiel Coffinberry began in Lancaster, Ohio in 1809; he was the son of that city’s first newspaper editor. More…

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History & Tourism

Cedar Point Gearing Up For A Full, Fun, Safe Summer

22 Feb , 2021  

Special to 1812Blockhouse

In the middle of each winter, we make an exception to our posting schedule to bring you a special “Summer Road Trip” to a place that generations of Richland Countians have known well and loved — Cedar Point Amusement Park.

Each winter, we post the Park’s look at new attractions and events for the coming season. Enjoy!

With the health and safety of guests and associates at its forefront, Cedar Point is excited to offer a full season of entertainment in 2021, including the celebration of its postponed 150th anniversary during the heart of the summer. Also returning are signature special events, a spectacular nighttime parade and party, a new family river adventure ride and chances to win the unprecedented Ticket of a Lifetime. More…

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History & Tourism

Landmarks Of Mansfield: Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Building

18 Feb , 2021  

By 1812Blockhouse

The Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Building, Park Avenue West’s Grand Old Lady, is both a local and statewide survivor. Since it opened in 1889, it has served veterans and the community well. Today it houses an extraordinary museum , provides character and dignity to Mansfield’s principal thoroughfare, and is a remarkable connection to what is arguably the most important conflict in American history.

In the years following the Civil War, the Ohio General Assembly passed laws which facilitated the financing and construction of buildings and monuments to serve and commemorate veterans of that conflict and earlier wars. Some cities, such as Sidney and Toledo, began local efforts even earlier. In total, 14 such structures were erected across the state. More…

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History & Tourism

When Mansfield Welcomed: General Rosalie Jones

17 Feb , 2021  

By 1812Blockhouse.

One hundred years ago this past November, women voted in a US Presidential election for the first time.

The road to the point was a long and difficult one. Some of the leading proponents of women’s suffrage are now well-known names from history — Susan B. Anthony in the United States, Emmeline Pankrust in England, and others.

One activist for women’s suffrage was certainly just as vocal and, at an important point in her crusade, was a visitor to Mansfield.

It was in July, 1912 when Rosalie Gardner Jones and her friend, Mrs. Elizabeth Freeman, made it to Richland County. More…

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History & Tourism

Travel Richland Without Breaking Healthy Routines

14 Feb , 2021  

From our friends at Destination Mansfield – Richland County:

It’s no secret: travel can interrupt healthy routines. While there are plenty of times when we want to allow ourselves some healthy indulgence, if you’re just starting a new habit or made a New Year’s Resolution, experts say it takes an average of 66 days for a new behavior to become a habit. But traveling doesn’t have to reset the counter to zero. Whether you’re planning a road trip or staying close to home, there are many opportunities to get out of the house while sticking to your new healthy habit. More…

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History & Tourism

Everything You Always Wanted To Know About: Mansfield’s Glessner Avenue

12 Feb , 2021  

By 1812Blockhouse

Glessner Avenue was named in honor of a Mansfield newspaper man who was a towering local figure in local business and civic affairs.

His name was John Y. Glessner.

Glessner was originally from Somerset County, Pennsylvania, which is where he started in the media business when he and his brother purchased a local paper. Moving first to St. Clairsville in southeast Ohio and then to Columbus, Glessner came to Mansfield in 1841.

From that time until his death in 1882, he owned and published the Richland County Shield and Banner. More…

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History & Tourism

Mansfield On The Map: Detailed Maps And Atlases Arrive

8 Feb , 2021  

By 1812Blockhouse

This is a brand-new post in our “Mansfield on the Map” series. For previous posts, click here.

Just two years after publication of the railroad map referenced in our last post in this series, a new mapping experience arrived in Richland County.

The 1856 “Map of Richland County,” based on surveys by P. O’Byrne, provided residents with the ability to identify lot property boundaries and owners in each township. Platted communities did not have property owners identified. More…

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History & Tourism

Mansfield On The Map: Richland County Changes Shape

7 Feb , 2021  

By 1812Blockhouse

Note: In early 2017, 1812Blockhouse published posts looking at the history of Mansfield and Richland County as that history is revealed on maps – maps of the area, county, and nation.

This is Part Two of a series; Part One can be found here.

The first fifty years of Ohio statehood saw the creation of counties and establishment of county boundaries – and then a re-shuffling of those boundaries, often by taking property from one and adding it to another or to an entirely new county. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: A Photographer Of War And The West: Part Two

5 Feb , 2021  

We’re continuing our look at the life and work of native Richland Countian Stanley J. Morrow, who was born near Bellville in 1843 and who was trained by famed Civil War photographer Mathew Brady.

Stanley Morrow’s studio in Yankton, Dakota Territory did well. So well, in fact, that Morrow soon opened a branch operation across the Missouri River in Nebraska. Still, he had a sense of adventure, perhaps cultivated in his Civil War experience. Over time, that sense led him to leave the family home and studio and travel westward; each time, he left his wife in charge of the local operation which continued to thrive. More…

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History & Tourism

Landmarks Of Mansfield: The Charles H. Voegele House

1 Feb , 2021  

By 1812Blockhoue

If this house had a nickname, it might well be “The House That Candy Built.”

One of the mansions of Mansfield that, while standing, have been altered substantially for commercial purposes, the Charles H. Voegele House at 514 Park Avenue West was home to a remarkably energetic figure in late 19th century and early 20th century Mansfield — and someone who performed a truly heroic act in his youth.

Charles Voegele was born in Germany in 1854, and came to Mansfield with his parents at the age of one. Attending school here, he went to New York City and became employed in the E. Greenfield & Sons Candy Company.

On December 20, 1877, the factory was rocked by an explosion and the entire complex burned to the ground, killing 13. Five of the female employees were personally saved by the actions of Charles Voegele, who was badly burned in the melee. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: A Photographer Of War And The West: Part One

30 Jan , 2021  

By 1812Blockhouse

Throughout its history, Richland County has produced or been the home to a wide variety of individuals that have made important contributions to the world. Among those is a man who learned his trade under extraordinary circumstances, and then used that training to create an important record that survives to this day.

Born near Bellville in 1843, Stanley J. Morrow’s childhood years were contemporaneous with the rise of photography in the United States. More…

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History & Tourism

Midstory Focuses In On Mansfield

28 Jan , 2021  

By 1812Blockhouse

Toledo-based Midstory describes itself this way:

“Midstory is dedicated to inform, interpret and inspire in post-indsturial communities across the Midwest through multimedia storytelling and solutions-oriented research.”

It does so through individual stories, series, podcasts, and more. Its goal is nothing less than creating a “…renewed socio-cultural capital in the Midwest.”

Having focused its lens not only on places, but on cultural and social topics ranging from local journalism in the Midwest to social inequities in reopening public libraries during the pandemic, this month it turned its attention to Richland County and, in particular, the city of Mansfield. More…

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History & Tourism

Hey, I Saw Your House In A Catalog: Sears Houses In Mansfield

27 Jan , 2021  

By 1812Blockhouse

If you live in Mansfield, there’s a chance that you might live near a residence that was bought out of a book.

A Sears catalog, to be exact.

With Sears in the news this last week with the impending closure of the store at Richland Mall, we are joining those reflecting back on the long history of that retail chain in Mansfield. One unique connection between the two was in the large number of houses which were purchased from Sears and erected along city streets. More…

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History & Tourism

Everything You Always Wanted To Know About: State Route 97

26 Jan , 2021  

By: 1812Blockhouse

We continue our series “Everything You Always Wanted To Know About,” where we dive into weeds to bring you details on Richland County ‘s geographical, cultural, and scenic landmarks. Other “Everything You Always Wanted To Know” posts in this series are available here.

It is not the longest, or the most-traveled, highway in the state or even the region.

Along its length, however, which runs almost 35 miles along farm fields, along rivers, and through small towns, State Route 97 adds a lot to the character of this place we call home. It even boasts the birthplace of a United States President! More…

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History & Tourism

Literary Mansfield: The Grande Dame Of Science Fiction

25 Jan , 2021  

By 1812Blockhouse

Through our “Literary Mansfield” series, we take occasional looks at the lives and careers of those who have called Mansfield home at some point in their lives, and who have become known locally, regionally, or even nationally as authorst, poets, lyricisits, playwrights, or in other literary fields. Other posts in the series can be found here.

Today, we deviate just a bit by looking at the life of someone who may have never lived in Mansfield, but lies buried in Mansfield Cemetery and has strong familial connections to the city.

Her birth name was Mary Alice Norton, but her legions of fans know her by her pseudonym, Andre Norton. Other pseudonyms used by Norton included Andrew North and Allen Weston. More…

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