History & Tourism

Bromfield And India: Early Newspaper Post Suggests A Possible Lifelong Interest

3 Aug , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

While doing other research last year, 1812Blockhouse discovered a coincidence about Bromfield’s life which connects his early years in Mansfield with his later success as an author. When we posted it, we were not aware if this story had been previously known.

As historians note, Louis Bromfield’s father and grandfather spelled their surname as “Brumfield,” with the father making the change to render the family name more “distinguished.” Louis was born in 1896 in Mansfield, and was a student in Mansfield schools.

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Bellville, History & Tourism

Richland Roots: The Poppletons

29 Jul , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

Richland County has produced or been the home to a wide variety of individuals that have made important contributions to the world. 1812Blockhouse has been sharing their stories in a series called “Richland Roots.” For other Richland Roots stories, click here.

There are children who you would imagine will live or have lived interesting lives because of their names. Blessed with obviously creative parents, they set out on journeys that take them to places as unique as their monikers.

Such is the case with a set of children born in Richland County in the first half of the nineteenth century, the Poppletons. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: Farmer, State Governor, Alaskan Gold Miner

13 Jul , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

Richland County has produced or been the home to a wide variety of individuals that have made important contributions to local, state, or national history. 1812Blockhouse has been sharing their stories in a series called “Richland Roots.” This is a brand new post; for other Richland Roots stories, click here.

Today on 1812Blockhouse we look at the remarkable life of a local man whose life took many twists and turns.

His name was John Whitnah Leedy, and he was born near Bellville on March 8, 1849. His paternal grandfather John Leedy had come to southern Richland County about 1815; his father Samuel Leedy was known as a singer and tavern keeper. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: The Gettysburg Surgeon From Plymouth

3 Jul , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

Note from 1812Blockhouse Publisher Thomas Palmer: I am pleased to re-share this story which concerns a relative of mine, the brother of one of my great great grandfathers. I am proud of his remarkable service during the American Civil War, and I was totally surprised years ago when I found that he lived in, and was buried in, Richland County. Two years ago I visited the Spangler Farm Field Hospital at Gettysburg where he treated Confederate General Lewis Armistead (see photo below).

Today marks the 156th anniversary of the final day of one of our country’s most important battles. During three hot summer days in 1863, tens of thousands of men — including many from Richland County — met to do battle on the verdant farm fields of Adams County, Pennsylvania.

One of those soliders, a major in the Army of the Potomac, has a permanent Richland County resting place in Plymouth’s Greenlawn Cemetery. Although only one of the players in what unfolded, his role was nevertheless a singular one, and the story of his place in the history of the Battle of Gettysburg continues to unfold.

His name was Jay Kling.

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History & Tourism

Richand Roots: The Gelatin Queen, Rose Knox

24 Jun , 2022  

By: 1812Blockhouse

Throughout its history, Richland County has produced or been the home to a wide variety of individuals that have made important contributions to the world. 1812Blockhouse has been sharing their stories in a series we call “Richland Roots.” For other Richland Roots stories, click here.

A woman referred to as one of the leading American businesspersons of the early 20th century received her own start in pre-Civil War Mansfield. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: A Photographer Of War And The West: Part Two

1 Jun , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

We’re continuing our look at the life and work of native Richland Countian Stanley J. Morrow, who was born near Bellville in 1843 and who was trained by famed Civil War photographer Mathew Brady.

Stanley Morrow’s studio in Yankton, Dakota Territory did well. So well, in fact, that Morrow soon opened a branch operation across the Missouri River in Nebraska. Still, he had a sense of adventure, perhaps cultivated in his Civil War experience. Over time, that sense led him to leave the family home and studio and travel westward; each time, he left his wife in charge of the local operation which continued to thrive.Over the next decade, Morrow became an important documenter of the American West, photographing Native Americans, forts, agencies, and military expeditions. In at least two instances, he took photographs of important places in the “Sioux Wars” of the late nineteenth century.

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: A Photographer Of War And The West: Part One

31 May , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

Updated 5.30.22. Throughout its history, Richland County has produced or been the home to a wide variety of individuals that have made important contributions to the world. Among those is a man who learned his trade under extraordinary circumstances, and then used that training to create an important record that survives to this day.

Born near Bellville in 1843, Stanley Julius Morrow’s childhood years were contemporaneous with the rise of photography in the United States. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: Mansfield-Born Painter Charles Henry Harmon

25 May , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

Around the turn of the last century, a prolific landscape painter gained a foothold in capturing the scenes of a changing western landscape.

That said, Charles Henry Harmon’s life began hundreds of miles to the east, right here in Richland County.

Born in Mansfield in 1859, he was the son of lawyer George B. and Clara Harmon. By the mid 1870s the family had relocated from Ohio to the sunnier confines of San Jose, California. 

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: The Tragic Tale Of Beautiful Miss Mansfield

9 May , 2022  

By: 1812Blockhouse

Throughout its history, Richland County has produced or been the home to a wide variety of individuals that have made important contributions to the world. 1812Blockhouse has been sharing their stories in a series we started last year called “Richland Roots.” For other Richland Roots stories, click here.

Occasionally, those tales take a tragic turn. During a film shoot in 1923, an aspiring actress suffered a gruesome fate that cut short what may well have been a brilliant career. This actress not only shared her name with the city of Mansfield, but it was the city that was the source of her professional name – Martha Mansfield. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: Samuel Stambaugh Bloom

3 May , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

In our Richland Roots series, we briefly present the lives of men and women from Richland County — either by birth, or residence — that have made important contributions to American history but who may not be household names. Other posts in our series can be viewed and read here.

Some of these individuals made names for themselves here at home. One such man was Samuel Stambaugh Bloom, who was a state legislator that helped to establish an important institution of higher education you may know (especially if you like anything Buckeye-related).

Bloom was born in Pennsylvania in 1834, and lost her mother shortly after his birth. After his grandfather died when Samuel was 19, he moved west to the then-village of Shelby, a place where his father had emigrated a decade earlier, permanently settling there in 1856. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: The Mansfielder Who Became Mayor Of New York City

31 Mar , 2022  

By: 1812Blockhouse

A bit over 120 years ago, a man with strong local roots occupied the position of Mayor of New York City. He was a reformer and set out to improve a corrupt system, a task which did not result in success.

His name was William Lafayette Strong.

1812Blockhouse shares posts in our “Richland Roots” series to reveal stories of the less-commonly known people born here, or who lived here, and then went on to make significant contributions to state, regional, or national history. Other posts in the series are available here. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: General Franklin Sawyer, A Hero Of Gettysburg

21 Mar , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

In our Richland Roots series, we briefly present the lives of men and women from Richland County — either by birth, or residence — that have made important contributions to American history but who may not be household names.

Other posts in our series can be read here.

Today, we share facts about Brevet Brigadier General Franklin Sawyer. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: The Man Who Followed Lewis And Clark

11 Mar , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

Over the last two centuries, Richland County has produced a remarkable set of individuals who have led lives of discovery. In the nineteenth century, that included men and women who traveled west where they were engaged in the exploration of areas of the country that were not then well known to Americans.

Once such individual was Olin Dunbar Wheeler.

Wheeler was born on May 1, 1852 in Mansfield to a Methodist minister and his wife; he had a twin sister, Ellen, who died when she was six weeks old. Orin excelled in schooling, and in 1874 graduated with a degree in civil engineering from Cornell University. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: An American Girl – The Life Of Olive Anderson

22 Feb , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

Her name was Olive San Louie Anderson.

Not only was her name a bit unusual, her life was a pacesetting one in the area of higher education for women. Unfortunately, it was also one which ended in tragedy.

1812Blockhouse shares posts in our “Richland Roots” series to talk about the less-commonly known stories of people born here or who lived here and went on to make significant contributions to state, regional, or national history. Other posts in the series are available here. More…

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History & Tourism

Richland Roots: Shelby’s Forgotten Medal Of Honor Recipient

16 Jan , 2022  

By 1812Blockhouse

In the 1980s, the name of David L. Cockley and tales of his heroism on the battlefield of the American Civil War, were largely forgotten. Efforts to organize records and sprucing up of Shelby’s Oakwood Cemetery in that period resulted in the recognition of just who he was.

Cockley was born in 1843 and entered the Union Army on October 20, 1862 as a private, quickly advancing to the rank of Full Lieutenant.

It was at the Battle of  Waynesboro on December 4, 1864 that Lieutenant Cockley did something truly admirable and for which he was later awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

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