History & Tourism

When Mansfield Welcomed: Buffalo Bill

18 Oct , 2017  

It was a brilliant Saturday in July, 1896 when Buffalo Bill came to town. Not just Buffalo Bill, mind you – his famous “Wild West Show” was in tow and put on two performances in a lot on East Fourth Street.

Buffalo Bill, born William Frederick Cody in 1846, grew up on the frontier and loved every aspect of that way of life. As he grew older, some of the titles he earned, or at least ascribed to himself, including buffalo hunter, U.S. Army scout and guide, and showman, as well as Pony Express Rider, Indian fighter, and even author. Whatever Cody’s titles, he was destined for fame. More…

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History & Tourism

Vintage Mansfield Photo Collection Accessible Online

15 Oct , 2017  

UPDATE: With our increasing number of daily readers, we’re re-running this post about a collection of vintage local photographs that can be viewed from your desktop, laptop, tablet, or smartphone that some may have missed.

Through a partnership with the Cleveland Memory Project, an online location for thousands of Cleveland area photographs sponsored by the Michael Schwartz Library at Cleveland State University, the Mansfield Richland County Public Library has set out to connect Mansfielders with their past. More…

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History & Tourism

When Mansfield Welcomed: Sir Harry Lauder

2 Oct , 2017  

A man once described by Winston Churchill as “Scotland’s greatest ever ambassador” included Mansfield among places he visited during his storied career.

At the time of his March 1916 visit, Harry Lauder was already the highest paid performer in the world. His visit took place at a time of increased anxiety in America, as the county was involved in arming the Allies in World War 1 but was still several months away from joining the fray. More…

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Downtown, History & Tourism

Landmarks of Mansfield: St. Peter’s Catholic Church

18 Sep , 2017  

NOTE: In honor of Sunday’s service commemorating the 100th anniversary of its landmark building, we are again sharing this Landmarks of Mansfield post we shared this past April.

For the last 100 years, the 125 feet high towers of the landmark St. Peter’s Catholic Church have themselves done double duty, standing sentinel over the central part of Mansfield while at the same time encouraging passers-by to look in a heavenly direction.

The 1889 church and current St. Peter’s, shortly after the latters’s construction

The building sits near an intersection that has been home to a Catholic church and school for almost seventeen decades. More…

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Downtown, History & Tourism

Landmarks Of Mansfield: Fifth And Walnut

6 Sep , 2017  

The vintage brick residence in downtown Mansfield is officially known as 159 North Walnut Street. Many locals, however, know it as the house at “The Corner of Fifth and Walnut,” the name of author M. Eileen Levinson’s autobiographical work profiling her childhood there in the 1920s and 1930s. More…

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History & Tourism

Weekend Event To Provide Window To The Past

4 Sep , 2017  

This coming weekend, Mansfield’s South Park will act as a time machine of sorts, giving contemporary men, women, and children the opportunity to immerse themselves in the world of late 18th century and early 19th century America.

Hosted by the Richland Early American Center for History, Living History Days will take place on Saturday, September 9 from 10 AM to 5 PM, and again on Sunday, September 10 from 10 AM until 4 PM. The event is free to the public. More…

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Downtown, History & Tourism

When Mansfield Welcomed: John Philip Sousa

3 Sep , 2017  

With this post, we begin a new series called “When Mansfield Welcomed.” Each time, we will look at the visit of a well-known individual or group to this part of Ohio. We begin with a musician whose reputation remains strong almost a century after his death.

The scene must have been extraordinary. The venue was the brand-new Memorial Opera House, a 565 seat auditorium situated in what was later the site of the Madison Theatre, and is now the parking lot of the Solders and Sailors Memorial Building on Park Avenue West. More…

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History & Tourism

A Mansfield Fourth, 150 Years Ago

4 Jul , 2017  

A century and a half ago, local media writers were bemoaning the lack of activities scheduled in Mansfield to celebrate Independence Day, with one exception: a “Base Ball” game between the “fats” and the “lanks.”

This is from the weekly Mansfield Herald’s edition on July 3, 1867: More…

History & Tourism

Indiana University Posts Vintage Photo Of Mansfield Landmark

20 Jun , 2017  

Last October, 1812Blockhouse focused one of the first posts in our “Landmarks of Mansfield” series on the Farmers Bank Building on Park Avenue West. More…

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History & Tourism

Memorial Day, Mansfield, 1896

29 May , 2017  

Mansfield was a bustling place in 1896, with a population of approximately 17,000. On Saturday, May 30, the community came together to celebrate Memorial Day.

First known nationally as “Decoration Day,” the term “Memorial Day” was first used in 1882. More…

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History & Tourism

Landmarks Of Mansfield: The Silas M. Douglas House

12 May , 2017  

This stately home on Park Avenue West was built by a man with a sterling reputation in the community.

His name was Silas Marion Douglas, but around Mansfield he was commonly referred to as “Judge Douglas.” He was born in January, 1853 in Monroe Township, Richland County, and was a graduate of both Heidelberg College in Tiffin and the Cincinnati Law College. More…

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All About Mansfield, History & Tourism

Healing History: A Tour Of Raemelton Therapeutic Equestrian Center

8 May , 2017  

As Sunday afternoon’s tour neared its end, guide Liberty Combs noted how fitting it was that the vision of industrialist Frank Black for an equestrian center is being carried forward, one hundred years later.

Raemelton Therapeutic Equestrian Center opened its doors on Saturday and Sunday as a part of RichHistory Weekend. The tours that were provided showcased both the effective therapeutic work being carried out there and also the unique history which connects Raemelton to the wider story of Mansfield. More…

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